Sunday, February 14, 2010

31 While 31--English Muffins

Two weeks ago, I posted my Thirty Things to Make While I'm Thirty list. This morning, I finally conquered my first recipe off the list. Being the breakfast lover I am, I knew I wanted to start with a breakfast recipe. After reviewing the list, I knew English muffins would be the way to begin.

I was staying the night at my mom's house and my step dad LOVES English muffins.
These did not disappoint. They smelled amazing, had a dense yet soft texture, and had a perfectly flaky crumb. We all enjoyed the fresh-baked yeasty taste. I will absolutely be making these again!


English Muffins
seen on The Mess Pot
originally from Peter Reinhart, The Bread Baker's Apprentice
printer-friendly recipe

Ingredients:
2 1/4 c. bread flour
1/2 TBSP sugar
3/4 tsp. salt
1 1/4 tsp. instant yeast
1 TBSP unsalted butter (at room temperature)
3/4 – 1 c. milk (at room temperature)
cornmeal for dusting

Directions:
1. Stir together the flour, sugar, salt and yeast in a mixing bowl or in the bowl of a stand mixer. Stir in the shortening and 3/4 cup milk until the ingredients form a ball. If there is still loose flour in the bowl, dribble in some of the remaining 1/4 milk. The dough should be soft and pliable, not stiff.

2. Sprinkle flour on the counter, transfer the dough to the counter and knead Alternately, mix on medium speed in your stand mixer using the dough hook. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes by hand or eight minutes in the mixer. If necessary, sprinkle in more flour to make a tacky, but not sticky, dough.

3. Lightly oil a large bowl and transfer the dough to the bowl, rolling to coat it with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Let rise for about an 60-90 minutes or until the dough doubles in size.

4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured counter or pastry mat. Divide into six equal pieces and roll the edges under to shape into balls.

5. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper, mist the parchment paper lightly with oil, and dust with cornmeal. Transfer the balls of dough to the sheet pan, spacing them three inches apart. Mist them lightly with spray oil, sprinkle loosely with cornmeal, and cover loosely with plastic wrap or a towel.


6. Proof at room temperature for 60-90 minutes, or until the pieces nearly double in size and swell both up and out.


7. Brush a pan or griddle with oil and heat to medium heat. Also, pre-heat the oven to 350 F.

8. Gently transfer muffins to the pan or griddle. Fill the pan so that the pieces at are at least one inch apart. Cook both sides for five to eight minutes each. They should be a rich golden brown and flattened.

9. When the dough will not brown any more without burning, transfer the pieces back to the parchment or Silpat-lined sheet pan and place in the oven. Bake five to eight minutes. While these are cooking, return to the uncooked pieces and cook them, hen bake them as you did the first round.

10. Transfer the baked muffins to a cooling rack and let cool for at least 30 minutes before slicing or serving.

7 comments :

Colleen said...

These look PERFECT for an AWESOME Eggs Benedict!!!!

Lexie said...

These were so amazing! Kelsey shaped and cooked them perfectly. The suttle yeast smell and taste were a wonderful compliment to our Breakfast Sandwiches with scrambled eggs, bacon, and tomato. Yummy!

Katie said...

YUMM!!! I love english muffins! Use them for egg sandwiches every morning. I can only IMAGINE how delicious fresh ones would be!

Tracy (Amuse-bouche for Two) said...

I think I could eat an english muffin a day for the rest of my life. I do love them. I need to break down and make them. They are also on my to do list. Yours look perfect, btw.

Jade said...

These are beautiful!! Great job. I really need to make these again. Glad you liked them.

Autumn said...

Way to go Kelsey!! Don't you just love making something you never thought you would and then it turning out just awesome!!

Valerie said...

Made these tonight - DELICIOUS! They had a bread-like texture on the inside, which was definitely tasty, but unlike the hole-ridden gems that I am used to. I found a good technique that recommends over-proofing the dough (overnight, room temp) to achieve a more traditional english muffin texture on the inside. Hoping to integrate that technique into this recipe for my next batch! Thank you for another well-presented recipe!